Slide Rule Summary ð 104


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Slide Rule Summary ð 104 · ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☃ Slide Rule Author Nevil Shute – Johns-cycling-diary.co.uk Nevil Shute best describes this autobiography in his own words Most of my adult life perhaps all the worthwhile part of it has been spent messing about with airplanes For 30 years there was a period w Nevil Shute best describes thiNevil Shute best describes this autobiography in his own words Most of my adult life perhaps all the worthwhile part of it has been spent messing about with airplanes For years there was a period when airplanes would fly when you wanted them to but there were still fresh. I first read Slide Rule years ago after enjoying many of Shute’s other books and it shaped my life in many ways He’d overcome so much from being a child with a bad stammer He was lucky in that he had wonderful parents He was made fun of at his school in Hammersmith not only by his school mates but by his teachers too Life was an unbearable misery and he could not take it So he played truant rode the trains or sat on railways stations observing the hubbub Later he rode into Kensington and spent hours in the British Museum studying the engineering exhibits like trains and planes Maybe Fate was smiling upon himIn 1915 Nevil and his family were sent to Ireland His father was to be the Post Master for the British Postal Service Nevil described how happy he and his brother Fred had been But this was short lived Nevil happened to be standing on Sackville Street in Dublin near the post office when all hell broke loose; the armed Irish uprising had begun The rebels rushed into the post office and took it over The Irish didn’t much like an Englishman being sent to run their postal system Luckily Nevil’s dad was in another building at the time or he may have been a casualty As a young lad of seventeen Nevil acted as a stretcher bearer during those dangerous hours He later received a commendation for his bravery Two years on his brother who Nevil said was the real literary one was dying from shell wounds and gangrene inflicted at the Front in France His mother and father had rushed to his bedside Nevil knew it was just a matter of time before he too was sent to France to die—it was the fate of all young men They expected it After being called up and trained for combat he was sent to the Isle of Grain for a time and fortunately for him and for us the war ended and he was sparedIn Slide Rule Nevil described going to Oxford and studying engineering at Balliol College He said it was a pleasant experience but his vacation time was even better since he went to work for DeHavillands for no pay There he met important people who would shape his life and teach him about aeroplane design and flyingLater he was hired by Barnes Wallis as Chief Calculator at Vickers Aircraft to work on the design of Airship R100 He was based at first in Crayford Kent where he put his team together and worked on initial design calculations He used to ride horses in Petts Wood in the early mornings on the common before going to work I know that beautiful area—I once lived there with my own familyAs part of his research bear in mind he knew nothing about airship design Nevil studied the spectacular Airship R38 disaster of 1921 which occurred over the River Humber and killed most of the American and British crewmen aboard as that ship broke in two His thoughts and writings on this tragic event were vital and for my own book R38’s midair breakup had severe ramifications effecting airship design as well as the final outcome of the airship program Cardington was desperate not to repeat previous mistakes As a conseuence and understandably they designed for strength but this tended to make their creation heavier It was a delicate balance and maddeningNevil was scathing in his criticism relating to the R38 in those early days—just as he would be nine years later after R101’s demise—not so much of the characters involved as with the system that caused it to occur or perhaps I should say that failed to prevent it occurring He highlighted what happens when government gets into the mix in aviation development and experimental flight The Challenger Disaster might be pointed to as a modern day example Nevil describes how in 1924 Lord Thomson set up the new British Airship Programme whereby two teams one private and one government would work in competition Thomson thought that he’d show once and for all that ‘government enterprise’ could out do ‘private enterprise’ Thomson believed the two systems were motivated by different underlying forces—the government by ‘the public good’ the private sector by ‘profit’—or as some called them money hungry profiteersWhen the private enterprise ship R100 was ready and tested it only remained for her to make a return flight to Canada Later the government ship R101 was to make a voyage to India with Thomson on board It was found that R101 was too heavy while R100 adeuately met contract reuirements The government team at Cardington made backdoor representations to the private team at Vickers to postpone their voyage This was high stakes now After being treated so badly by the government team for four years Nevil and his bosses Barnes Wallis and Dennis Burney refused They could hardly be expected to bail the other team out So in July of 1930 they slipped from the mast and set off for CanadaThe private Vickers team was lucky and made it to Canada and back while R101 was being cut in half so that an extra gas bag could be inserted to get her precious extra lift On October 4th 1930 R101 took off in a storm bound for India Thomson had his schedule which could not be delayed She crashed on a hillside in Beauvais the ignition of six million cubic feet of hydrogen lighting up the French countryside for miles All but six were killed including Thomson himself There’s a lot to this story in terms of human drama making it an epic on a par with TitanicAfter that disaster there was an inuiry of course And like most government inuiries no one was found guilty of anything The airship program was abandoned and Nevil’s beloved Airship R100 was destroyed The only people left in Britain ualified enough to testify were members of the Vickers team The government did not ask them to testify or even to attend the massive state funeral in London Many of Nevil’s friends were among the deadIn 2010 I was traveling from Heathrow to Dulles and I was reading Slide Rule again on my Kindle I wanted to learn about Nevil Shute’s life as an airshipman when he was Deputy Chief Engineer building Airship R100 in that monster shed in Howden Yorkshire Eyes tired I put the book aside and looked out the window We were flying along the St Lawrence Seaway Canada I peered down at the Laurentian Mountains in the province of uebec and marveled at the thought of how brave those men were when they flew just above the water down there on that Thursday July 31 of 1930 They had flown over the majestic steamships Duchess of Bedford and Empress of Scotland with their stately dark blue hulls and white topsides—with thousands cheering wildly up at them from their decksThey had beat against a headwind making way at about 36 knots During this leg of the voyage they experienced two severe problems although Nevil seems to rather play it down in his stiff upper lip account The first was due to turbulent air flowing down from the Saguenay River Valley that ran between 4000 foot mountains into the St Lawrence It caused R100 to roll wildly and made for panicked moments on board The crewmen in their engine cars signaled to say they had spotted severe damage to the cover on the tail sections The ship was maneuvered to a calm area near an island on the opposite shore where the riggers precariously clambered around on the tail fins high above the water making repairs After patching her up temporarily they set off again The second incident occurred uite unnecessarily through poor judgement according to Nevil While crawling around on the roof the second officer and some riggers eyed a dangerous thunderstorm looming on the horizon Major Scott the most senior officer ordered them to fly directly through it despite the protestations of the captain Scott had decided time was of the essence—suicide for an airship As they entered the swirling black mass the ship went from 1000 feet up to 5000 feet in a matter of seconds To her credit and the engineering genius of Barnes Wallis the ship remained in one piece Peering down over the St Lawrence that day helped somehow in my writing about these life threatening fist biting events in The Airshipmen I had to wonder what Nevil would have thought if he’d been able to look up and see our Boeing 777 careering along at 600 mph at 40000 feet He may have thought we were the crazy onesIn Slide Rule Nevil also tells of his business dealings with Airspeed I hadn’t appreciated his entrepreneurial brilliance He built an aircraft company rivaling De Havillands His decency comes out in that text his concerns for his employees 800 of them if they went bust—which always appeared to be looming on the horizon That was the core of Nevil’s personality decency goodness and modesty I enjoyed this autobiography and seeing than I’d seen in earlier readings over the years Some say the most important thing about a book is whether it changes the way you view life Well Nevil Shute’s novels certainly had an effect on me as a teenager After reading his autobiography and novels I wanted to build a company to travel to sail and to fly and yes to write I came close to accomplishing the first and managed the rest I even ended up including Nevil in my own book He was a thoroughly decent English chap modest and underestimated He was the type of man you’d want as a friend—a standup guy I hope I’ve done him justice I portrayed him as the most lovable character of them all

Slide RuleNevil Shute best describes this autobiography in his own words Most of my adult life perhaps all the worthwhile part of it has been spent messing about with airplanes For years there was a period when airplanes would fly when you wanted them to but there were still fresh. I first read Slide Rule years ago after enjoying many of Shute’s other books and it shaped my life in many ways He’d overcome so much from being a child with a bad stammer He was lucky in that he had wonderful parents He was made fun of at his school in Hammersmith not only by his school mates but by his teachers too Life was an unbearable misery and he could not take it So he played truant rode the trains or sat on railways stations observing the hubbub Later he rode into Kensington and spent hours in the British Museum studying the engineering exhibits like trains and planes Maybe Fate was smiling upon himIn 1915 Nevil and his family were sent to Ireland His father was to be the Post Master for the British Postal Service Nevil described how happy he and his brother Fred had been But this was short lived Nevil happened to be standing on Sackville Street in Dublin near the post office when all hell broke loose; the armed Irish uprising had begun The rebels rushed into the post office and took it over The Irish didn’t much like an Englishman being sent to run their postal system Luckily Nevil’s dad was in another building at the time or he may have been a casualty As a young lad of seventeen Nevil acted as a stretcher bearer during those dangerous hours He later received a commendation for his bravery Two years on his brother who Nevil said was the real literary one was dying from shell wounds and gangrene inflicted at the Front in France His mother and father had rushed to his bedside Nevil knew it was just a matter of time before he too was sent to France to die—it was the fate of all young men They expected it After being called up and trained for combat he was sent to the Isle of Grain for a time and fortunately for him and for us the war ended and he was sparedIn Slide Rule Nevil described going to Oxford and studying engineering at Balliol College He said it was a pleasant experience but his vacation time was even better since he went to work for DeHavillands for no pay There he met important people who would shape his life and teach him about aeroplane design and flyingLater he was hired by Barnes Wallis as Chief Calculator at Vickers Aircraft to work on the design of Airship R100 He was based at first in Crayford Kent where he put his team together and worked on initial design calculations He used to ride horses in Petts Wood in the early mornings on the common before going to work I know that beautiful area—I once lived there with my own familyAs part of his research bear in mind he knew nothing about airship design Nevil studied the spectacular Airship R38 disaster of 1921 which occurred over the River Humber and killed most of the American and British crewmen aboard as that ship broke in two His thoughts and writings on this tragic event were vital and for my own book R38’s midair breakup had severe ramifications effecting airship design as well as the final outcome of the airship program Cardington was desperate not to repeat previous mistakes As a conseuence and understandably they designed for strength but this tended to make their creation heavier It was a delicate balance and maddeningNevil was scathing in his criticism relating to the R38 in those early days—just as he would be nine years later after R101’s demise—not so much of the characters involved as with the system that caused it to occur or perhaps I should say that failed to prevent it occurring He highlighted what happens when government gets into the mix in aviation development and experimental flight The Challenger Disaster might be pointed to as a modern day example Nevil describes how in 1924 Lord Thomson set up the new British Airship Programme whereby two teams one private and one government would work in competition Thomson thought that he’d show once and for all that ‘government enterprise’ could out do ‘private enterprise’ Thomson believed the two systems were motivated by different underlying forces—the government by ‘the public good’ the private sector by ‘profit’—or as some called them money hungry profiteersWhen the private enterprise ship R100 was ready and tested it only remained for her to make a return flight to Canada Later the government ship R101 was to make a voyage to India with Thomson on board It was found that R101 was too heavy while R100 adeuately met contract reuirements The government team at Cardington made backdoor representations to the private team at Vickers to postpone their voyage This was high stakes now After being treated so badly by the government team for four years Nevil and his bosses Barnes Wallis and Dennis Burney refused They could hardly be expected to bail the other team out So in July of 1930 they slipped from the mast and set off for CanadaThe private Vickers team was lucky and made it to Canada and back while R101 was being cut in half so that an extra gas bag could be inserted to get her precious extra lift On October 4th 1930 R101 took off in a storm bound for India Thomson had his schedule which could not be delayed She crashed on a hillside in Beauvais the ignition of six million cubic feet of hydrogen lighting up the French countryside for miles All but six were killed including Thomson himself There’s a lot to this story in terms of human drama making it an epic on a par with TitanicAfter that disaster there was an inuiry of course And like most government inuiries no one was found guilty of anything The airship program was abandoned and Nevil’s beloved Airship R100 was destroyed The only people left in Britain ualified enough to testify were members of the Vickers team The government did not ask them to testify or even to attend the massive state funeral in London Many of Nevil’s friends were among the deadIn 2010 I was traveling from Heathrow to Dulles and I was reading Slide Rule again on my Kindle I wanted to learn about Nevil Shute’s life as an airshipman when he was Deputy Chief Engineer building Airship R100 in that monster shed in Howden Yorkshire Eyes tired I put the book aside and looked out the window We were flying along the St Lawrence Seaway Canada I peered down at the Laurentian Mountains in the province of uebec and marveled at the thought of how brave those men were when they flew just above the water down there on that Thursday July 31 of 1930 They had flown over the majestic steamships Duchess of Bedford and Empress of Scotland with their stately dark blue hulls and white topsides—with thousands cheering wildly up at them from their decksThey had beat against a headwind making way at about 36 knots During this leg of the voyage they experienced two severe problems although Nevil seems to rather play it down in his stiff upper lip account The first was due to turbulent air flowing down from the Saguenay River Valley that ran between 4000 foot mountains into the St Lawrence It caused R100 to roll wildly and made for panicked moments on board The crewmen in their engine cars signaled to say they had spotted severe damage to the cover on the tail sections The ship was maneuvered to a calm area near an island on the opposite shore where the riggers precariously clambered around on the tail fins high above the water making repairs After patching her up temporarily they set off again The second incident occurred uite unnecessarily through poor judgement according to Nevil While crawling around on the roof the second officer and some riggers eyed a dangerous thunderstorm looming on the horizon Major Scott the most senior officer ordered them to fly directly through it despite the protestations of the captain Scott had decided time was of the essence—suicide for an airship As they entered the swirling black mass the ship went from 1000 feet up to 5000 feet in a matter of seconds To her credit and the engineering genius of Barnes Wallis the ship remained in one piece Peering down over the St Lawrence that day helped somehow in my writing about these life threatening fist biting events in The Airshipmen I had to wonder what Nevil would have thought if he’d been able to look up and see our Boeing 777 careering along at 600 mph at 40000 feet He may have thought we were the crazy onesIn Slide Rule Nevil also tells of his business dealings with Airspeed I hadn’t appreciated his entrepreneurial brilliance He built an aircraft company rivaling De Havillands His decency comes out in that text his concerns for his employees 800 of them if they went bust—which always appeared to be looming on the horizon That was the core of Nevil’s personality decency goodness and modesty I enjoyed this autobiography and seeing than I’d seen in earlier readings over the years Some say the most important thing about a book is whether it changes the way you view life Well Nevil Shute’s novels certainly had an effect on me as a teenager After reading his autobiography and novels I wanted to build a company to travel to sail and to fly and yes to write I came close to accomplishing the first and managed the rest I even ended up including Nevil in my own book He was a thoroughly decent English chap modest and underestimated He was the type of man you’d want as a friend—a standup guy I hope I’ve done him justice I portrayed him as the most lovable character of them all

Summary ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ☆ Nevil Shute

Slide Rule à After WW I when I was a young man it died with WW II when airplanes had grown too costly and too complicated for individuals to build or even to operate I count myself lucky that that fleeting period coincided with my youth and my young manhood and that I had a part in it. I started reading this book because of the wrecked dirigible on the cover of my edition I have always been fascinated with them as a means of transport of heavy materials I did not know that Mr Shute was Norwegian nor that he worked on one of the only two English dirigibles Thus only the first half of the book did I find really interesting I was interested in the specifics of the dirigible than in Mr Shute Summary ↠ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ☆ Nevil Shute

Nevil Shute ☆ 4 Summary

Nevil Shute ☆ 4 Summary Things to be learned on every flight a period when airplanes were small and so easily built that experiments were cheap and new designs could fly within six months of the first glimmer in the mind of the designerThat halcyon period started about and it was in full flower. returnreturnIt's a book in three parts the first couple of chapters describe Shute's boyhood and youth where the most exciting part is his close observation of the Easter Rising of 1916 his father as it happens was the Secretary of the Irish Post Office so there is a certain immediacy to Shute's account from an angle one doesn't often get that of a middle class English teenager pressed into service as a stretcher bearerreturnreturnThen a bit over half the book is devoted to a fascinating account of Shute's involvement with the R100 the private sector counterpart to the doomed state funded R101 British airship This was at the cutting edge of technology a prestige engineering project every bit as important in its way as the moon landings which was to open up mass travel between the continents at a time when it was thought that aeroplanes would never be able to be big enough or fast enough to satisfy the commercial demand Shute clearly loved his own creation he was deputy to Barnes Wallis but ended up de facto in charge and goes into fascinating detail about the problems they faced both technical and political; and looming over the narrative of course is the eventual R101 disaster which he blames on the failings of senior civil servants as technical managers and on the general policy of having any state run industry and specifically the ego of Lord Thomson the Air Minister who paid for it with his life and the lives of dozens of othersreturnreturnThe final chunk of the book a bit over a third of it is Shute's account of setting up his own aircraft company and the difficulties of running a hi tech startup in the context of the Great Depression Again an interesting human tale of innovation struggle against the odds the difficulties of balancing the books and the personalities the intimate involvement of people and capital; I think it ought to be reuired reading for anyone thinking of setting up their own business On top of that the looming clouds of war in Spain China and Ethiopia and coming up close to home were crucial in making the company break even by the time he was eased out with a golden handshake in 1938returnreturnShute isn't shy about his politics which are certainly to the right I guess that being caught on the wrong side of a revolution at 17 and then seeing your professional colleagues killed by the hubris of a Labour government minister may well be formative experiences but he also argues for the retention of the moneyed aristocracy as a source of start up finance for innovation I'm not in huge sympathy with him on these points but I like his clear and occasionally self deprecating prose; the two books of his that I have read Pied Piper and Trustee from the Toolroom are both rather enchanting tales of older men who accidentally go on long journeys to do good deeds and it's interesting to see where this comes from