No Man's Nightingale Read & Download ´ 4

Download Õ PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook  Ruth Rendell

No Man's NightingaleA female vicar named Sarah Hussein is discovered strangled in her Kingsmarkham vicarage Maxine No Man's Kindle the gossipy cleaning woman who discovers her body happens to also be in the employ of retired Chief Inspector Wexford and his wife When called on by his old deputy detective inspector Mike Burden Wexford intrigued by the unusual circumstan. It was a real pleasure to revisit Wexford in his retirement although this time he has been called in as a kind of consulting detective with his old bagman Burden now Superintendent Burden and very much the bossThe local vicar a single mother of mixed race a combination designed to bring out the very worst in her conservative parishioners has been battered to death in the vicarage A high profile murder and Burden has asked his old superior to assist and Wexford gladly agreesHe does so with an unexpected streak of naughtiness while he pursues the case almost on his own convinced that Burden is on the wrong scent This independent streak causes him to be wracked with spasms of guilt as he removes evidence without authorization and commits other investigative sins none of which particularly excite Burden who treats him with perhaps surprising toleration even when Wexford takes obvious and somewhat petty delight in pointing out Burden's errorsThe ongoing evolution in Wexford's character his complicated family relationships and the evolution of a beautifully developed mystery with suspect succeeding suspect make this post career entry one of the best Wexford books in years and I can only hope that he is allowed to continue in his new consultative role Highly recommended

review No Man's Nightingale

No Man's Nightingale Read & Download ´ 4 á ❴KINDLE❵ ✽ No Man's Nightingale Author Ruth Rendell – Johns-cycling-diary.co.uk A female vicar named Sarah Hussein is discovered strangled in her Kingsmarkham vicarage Maxine the gossipy cleaning woman who discovers her body happens to also be in the employ of retired ChiCes of the murder leaps at the chance to tag along with the investigatorsA single mother to a teenage girl Hussein was a woman working in a male dominated profession Moreover she was of mixed race and working to modernize the church Could racism or sexism have played a factor in her murderAs Wexford searches the Vicar’s house he sees a book on her. Better than the last Wexford which was dire but still not one of the best I know Wexford is now retired but this is still a contemporary novel and shouldn’t feel so “old fashioned” I’ve always thought RR’s writing style set her apart from her peers but the prose here seems plodding and often repetitious I spotted a couple of unforgiveable errors again the name of the supermarket changes from the fictional uesto to the real life Tesco and Burden’s calendar has photos of police station at the beginning of the case which changes to Cornish pond life with the New Year but in March we’re back to police stations This sort of thing has happened in most of RR’s recent work Her editor assuming it is the same one really needs taking to task

Ruth Rendell  4 review

Bedside table Inside the book is a letter serving as a bookmark Without thinking much Wexford puts it into his pocket Wexford soon realizes he has made a grave error in removing a piece of valuable evidence from the scene without telling anybody Yet what he finds inside begins to illuminate the murky past of Hussein Is there to her than meets the eye. There are aspects of the Victorian novel in this latest Wexford and the slow pace probably won’t appeal to those who prefer action and less ratiocinationThe plot centers on the murder of a female vicar whose sex race and status as a single mother have not won her much sympathy among her conservative flock These factors open the door to multiple suspects and numerous red herringsReg Wexford in retirement seems to have become rather stuffy and even a bit of a crank though the intelligence and humor are still to be found as Burden “allows” his former boss to participate in the investigation We are reminded repeatedly that Reg has no legal authority yet he still seems to get cooperation from the people they encounterThough I prefer her psychological suspense novels to the Wexford series Rendell still delights with her uirky characters sharp insights and convoluted plots She even managed to include a trademark linguistic clue and I missed it