CHARACTERS Once You Know This õ PDF eBook or Kindle ePUB


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CHARACTERS Once You Know This õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Þ ❰Reading❯ ➹ Once You Know This Author Emily Blejwas – Johns-cycling-diary.co.uk A girl wishes for a better life for herself her mom and her baby brother and musters the courage to make it happen in this moving and emotionally satisfying sA girl wishes for a better life for herself her mom and her baby brother and musters the courage to make it happen in this moving and emotionally satisfying story for readers of Kate DiCamillo and Lynda Mullaly Hunt Eleven year old Brittany knows there has to be a better world out there Lately though it sure doesn’t feel like it She and her best fr. Gosh I really don't like to give bad reviews I want to find something good about a book and lead with it I write I know how difficult the process can be But I also sell books and I sell books to kids This book is marketed to kids 9 12 In the first 50 pages the the main character deals with domestic violence grandparent dementia and possible neglect poverty food insecurity mental illness suicide parental illness inference of teachers homosexuality an underfunded school I think there were a few thingsbut it was a pretty long list and I could not remember them all I am going to break this downWhen we sell books to children 9 years old we have to consider a couple of things First what is their reading level Second what is their level of sophistication Successful books for this age can be issue books But they deal with one maybe two issues I consider Donna Gephart's book Death by Toilet Paper to be an excellent example of this It deals with a boy who has lost his father to cancer and the ensuing financial dislocation to his home There is a grandfather who has slight dementia but he adds to the story and does not add burden to the child It is a funny book with a lot of heart and most importantly there are some solid adults in the story Another great book in this vein is Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate In this story the main character is coping with potential homelessness with the return of an imaginary friend who just so happens to be a giant talking purple cat It is sweet It is clear that the adults in the story are struggling But the reader can have empathy for their plightI understand that children in this world grow up in difficult circumstances The world is not a fair place for children For at risk children they want to know that there are books that can reflect their life This book just feels like it is trying to hit them over the head with how miserable their life is The message of hope it tries impart gets lost in the fear I felt this character must feel living in a home with an abuser There was no humor nothing to lighten the tension of this child in crisis The ending was predictable I have serious concerns about recommending this book to children as young as nine because it really feels like it is asking too much of them Some of the issues listed above were couched in language that I am not sure a 9 year old reader would get The reference to suicide was something I as an adult picked up on but I am not sure a 9 year old kid would Is it really necessary to the main character's story The reference to homosexuality of the teacher brought up in a note passed between students in class again is this necessary to the story of the main character If the character were a little older if there were less issue boxes trying to be checked off if there were just a little softness to the storyNow some fine print I don't just come at this book as a snobby bookseller I grew up in an abusive home I have known poverty The one and only thing I can say saved me from this was the library and my library card Books taught me how to be empathetic Books painted a world of possibility Books showed me what normal looked like Books gave me the tools to cope with what was happening in my home I did not want to read stories of girls who lived horrible lives I was already doing that I wanted to read stories of girls who were spunky assertive I wanted to read fantasy and adventure I wanted to read about horses I wanted to read friendship stories I can appreciate that the author as a victim advocate has tapped into her experience to write this book I am sure she has seen things many of us can not comprehend This book is going to be marketed to 9 12 year olds not just those who may share the same story as the girl in this book but those kids who may want to understand at risk kids I am just not sure this is the book I could recommend

Once You Know ThisA girl wishes for a better life for herself her mom and her baby brother and musters the courage to make it happen in this moving and emotionally satisfying story for readers of Kate DiCamillo and Lynda Mullaly Hunt Eleven year old Brittany knows there has to be a better world out there Lately though it sure doesn’t feel like it She and her best fr. Gosh I really don't like to give bad reviews I want to find something good about a book and lead with it I write I know how difficult the process can be But I also sell books and I sell books to kids This book is marketed to kids 9 12 In the first 50 pages the the main character deals with domestic violence grandparent dementia and possible neglect poverty food insecurity mental illness suicide parental illness inference of teachers homosexuality an underfunded school I think there were a few thingsbut it was a pretty long list and I could not remember them all I am going to break this downWhen we sell books to children 9 years old we have to consider a couple of things First what is their reading level Second what is their level of sophistication Successful books for this age can be issue books But they deal with one maybe two issues I consider Donna Gephart's book Death by Toilet Paper to be an excellent example of this It deals with a boy who has lost his father to cancer and the ensuing financial dislocation to his home There is a grandfather who has slight dementia but he adds to the story and does not add burden to the child It is a funny book with a lot of heart and most importantly there are some solid adults in the story Another great book in this vein is Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate In this story the main character is coping with potential homelessness with the return of an imaginary friend who just so happens to be a giant talking purple cat It is sweet It is clear that the adults in the story are struggling But the reader can have empathy for their plightI understand that children in this world grow up in difficult circumstances The world is not a fair place for children For at risk children they want to know that there are books that can reflect their life This book just feels like it is trying to hit them over the head with how miserable their life is The message of hope it tries impart gets lost in the fear I felt this character must feel living in a home with an abuser There was no humor nothing to lighten the tension of this child in crisis The ending was predictable I have serious concerns about recommending this book to children as young as nine because it really feels like it is asking too much of them Some of the issues listed above were couched in language that I am not sure a 9 year old reader would get The reference to suicide was something I as an adult picked up on but I am not sure a 9 year old kid would Is it really necessary to the main character's story The reference to homosexuality of the teacher brought up in a note passed between students in class again is this necessary to the story of the main character If the character were a little older if there were less issue boxes trying to be checked off if there were just a little softness to the storyNow some fine print I don't just come at this book as a snobby bookseller I grew up in an abusive home I have known poverty The one and only thing I can say saved me from this was the library and my library card Books taught me how to be empathetic Books painted a world of possibility Books showed me what normal looked like Books gave me the tools to cope with what was happening in my home I did not want to read stories of girls who lived horrible lives I was already doing that I wanted to read stories of girls who were spunky assertive I wanted to read fantasy and adventure I wanted to read about horses I wanted to read friendship stories I can appreciate that the author as a victim advocate has tapped into her experience to write this book I am sure she has seen things many of us can not comprehend This book is going to be marketed to 9 12 year olds not just those who may share the same story as the girl in this book but those kids who may want to understand at risk kids I am just not sure this is the book I could recommend

REVIEW Ù PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB × Emily Blejwas

Once You Know This ↠ Ieving in herself Brittany realizes that what has always seemed out of reach might be just around the corner This debut novel by Emily Blejwas is perfect for readers who love emotionally satisfying books Thoughtful and understated it’s the hopeful story of a girl who struggles to make her future bright and the makeshift family that emerges around h. I wanted to reach into this book and take care of Brittany myself I identified so much with her confusion and struggle with figuring out how to help her mom get her family into a safer situation I have lived in Chicago most of my life but I had resources than Brittany and her family did It made me sad in the beginning when she did not have a vision of the future for herself I am so glad she found her inner strength REVIEW Ù PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB × Emily Blejwas

Emily Blejwas × 6 CHARACTERS

Emily Blejwas × 6 CHARACTERS Iend Marisol stick together at school but at home Brittany’s granny is sick her cat is missing there’s never any money Once You MOBI #233 and there’s her little brother Tommy to worry about Brittany has a hard time picturing her future as anything but a plain white sky If her life is going to ever change she needs a plan And once she starts bel. I enjoyed how the story shows a lot of major problems in the world and in the city of Chicago from the viewpoint of such a young child She sees abuse she lives in poverty she sees violence and she sees the issues with funding for Chicago schools I liked how the author incorporated those elements beyond the basic plot This book is inspiring to young children Living in the grim reality that she lived in Brittany's determination and positivity will inspire other children to feel hope as well and realize that everybody has a future Read my full review at