Download Book ↠ Die Wiederholung Ê 246 pages ´ Peter handke


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Download Book ↠ Die Wiederholung Ê 246 pages ´ Peter handke ✓ ➵ [Reading] ➷ Die Wiederholung By Peter Handke ➪ – Johns-cycling-diary.co.uk Set in 1960 this novel tells of Filib Kobal's journey from his home in Carinthia to Slovenia on the trail of his missing brother GrWords The resulting investigation of the laws of language and naming becomes a transformative investigation of himself and the world around him This book probably deserves than three stars The language is beautiful and there are so many great sentences and descriptions I had no idea what was going on though I think it might be ignorance on my part about Austria and Slovenia so much of the book was connected with the physical locations and place and their relationship between places and homelessness from one place that I had to make up in my head what I thought was being said but my made up ideas didn't carry the weight Handke intended The novel itself seemed out of place there was something very 'modern' about it taking place in the 1960's but the entire book also felt like it came from an earlier time and that people don't necessarily write books like this any What do I mean? I don't know there was something about the book that straddled ohhhhh I see a link in the book now over the two world wars with one foot on the literature of the of an earlier time and one in the 1960's Reading the book was a very pleasant experience and now that I'm thinking harder about the book as a whole I'm starting to appreciate it even I wouldn't recommend it to most people though it's a bit too much of what gets called a 'writers book' which usually means a book where not much happens but which is written in an interesting and technically beautiful way

Die WiederholungWords The resulting investigation of the laws of language and naming becomes a transformative investigation of himself and the world around him This book probably deserves than three stars The language is beautiful and there are so many great sentences and descriptions I had no idea what was going on though I think it might be ignorance on my part about Austria and Slovenia so much of the book was connected with the physical locations and place and their relationship between places and homelessness from one place that I had to make up in my head what I thought was being said but my made up ideas didn't carry the weight Handke intended The novel itself seemed out of place there was something very 'modern' about it taking place in the 1960's but the entire book also felt like it came from an earlier time and that people don't necessarily write books like this any What do I mean? I don't know there was something about the book that straddled ohhhhh I see a link in the book now over the two world wars with one foot on the literature of the of an earlier time and one in the 1960's Reading the book was a very pleasant experience and now that I'm thinking harder about the book as a whole I'm starting to appreciate it even I wouldn't recommend it to most people though it's a bit too much of what gets called a 'writers book' which usually means a book where not much happens but which is written in an interesting and technically beautiful way

Reader ↠ Die Wiederholung ✓ Peter Handke

Die Wiederholung ✓ Rmed only with two of Gregor's books a copy book from agricultural school and a Slovenian German dictionary in which Gregor has marked certain A full review to come on this complex and intriguing bookFilip Kobal twenty years old crosses into Yugoslavia leaving for the first time the hard working earnest life of his village his homeland of Austria behind There rests the laborers the strict ruled lines of the Seminary he was sent to the hapless life of an unloving father a dying mother and a mute sister lolling in a bemused catatonia consisting of sitting and watching There is no reflection of him The mirror hoisted by neighbors townspeople his own family does not take into account the sensitive perceptiveness of his imaginative mind Wherever he looks the mirror is blank He does not speak their language nor they his His only relationship is with a school teacher who specializes in fairy tales Alone he crosses the border seeking his missing brother carrying the brother’s two books a dictionary and a journal This brother blind in one eye perhaps has gone AWOL from the army leaving the life of the military and its beleaguered aims andor the life of the world?Where to find others like him where to find his self? How to live with this aloneness and separation especially when realizing the need to have others in order for this sought self to emerge What he has are words words describing objects and experiences but are not the objects and experiences themselves There are though dreams and from those dreams emerge stories and from those stories an imaginative path to truths Never ending paths Paths trod alone Each step brings the purpose of meaning Is there a way of describing this to the hardworking laborers of his village? A way of explaining any of this to anyone? Boundaries have been set and also dissolvedThis holy scroll of a tale sets out to live the life the experience of Filip whose existence lies in the world of memories and imagination as borders and boundaries lift away Reader ↠ Die Wiederholung ✓ Peter Handke

Peter Handke ✓ Die Wiederholung Kindle

Peter Handke ✓ Die Wiederholung Kindle Set in 1960 this novel tells of Filib Kobal's journey from his home in Carinthia to Slovenia on the trail of his missing brother Gregor He is a 2019 Nobel Prize Winner UpdateFirst there was Proust then there was Handke I shall try to explain Repetition is a poststructuralist ur text of sorts a landmark a foundational meditation on language phenomenology and the work of memory As Filib Kobal Handke's geographically and linguistically displaced narrator states I look on memory as than a haphazard thinking back—as work; the work of memory situates experience in a seuence that keeps it alive a story which can open out into free storytelling greater life invention And isn't that one of the lessons that Proust had taught us echoed by the work of Freud—namely that memory is work but a repetitive process worth undertaking for the freedom the greater life and the individuality that springs from this very active process?Proust's Recherche is perhaps the seminal modernist text to cite memory as its thematic concern and specifically how memory can inform an individual's relation to others their surroundings and even in the end alter the spatial and temporal landscapes of their lives Handke's project in Repetition is similar; as such it is no surprise that he titles his work after Freud's concept of Wiederholungszwang or repetition compulsion Related to trauma Freud's concept insists on the act of recollection and active memory as repeated forces to overcome traumatic events in lieu of a neurotic repression of themIsn't this what Proust's Narrator is doing in the Recherche? And to the point here this is certainly what Handke's Kobal is doing in Repetition; indeed Handke's situation of Kobal in a deterritorialized borderland between cultures languages and histories is critical to the work of memory; in addition Handke channels Proust in Kobal's iterative considerations of place names which constitute both an objective history ie what the books say what is passed down by word of mouth and a subjective one too ie what is experienced as truth by the individual what the place causes the selfto be to becomeA twenty year old who has left his native Austria for Yugoslavia in order to follow the path of his long absent and presumed dead brother Kobal relies on the stories from his past—his seminary days; life in a Carinthian village where both German and Slovene words were part of daily conversation; and a post war existence that excludes him from the traumatic histories of those with whom he lives—and also the stories he unearths in two books his brother Gregor has left behind an agricultural journal largely concerned with the methods of planting and care of a bountiful and fruitful orchard and a German Slovenian dictionaryThis latter book provides Kobal with a deep portrait of the interior life of his brother and also cause him to confront the trauma of living in the interstitial space between language citizenship cultural familial and national identity and a host of other conflicts which Handke allows his narrator to explore through interacting—almost tangibly tracing them in the air—with words In Repetition the working through comes from Kobal's realization that language is not a stable or static structure but one that can be used to render deeply personal and subjective experiences into a exacting and presentable form a form that in the end is able to unite us with others even despite the inherent trappings of language In spite of our linguistic differences Handke seems to argue we all have the same personalized relationship with words at our disposal there to help us work through come to terms and in the end overcome by means of perpetual and ongoing workWhile Proust's text is the modernist literary ur text dealing with memory and its relation to trauma Handke's is the poststructuralist literary ur text dealing with this same major theme and its Lacanian reworking of Freud are present but extremely subtle—eg the interchanging of words for objects; the insistence on signs as incomplete according to a structural Saussurean model of language—but work to position Repetition within a genre of largely Austrian produced works from the mid 1980s onward dealing with memory and phenomenology alongside these uestionings of linguistic and territorial borders Handke's background as a dramatist links him for example to the narrativemonologic experiments one finds in the work of Thomas Bernhard his contemporary but the argument I hope still holds and Elfriede Jelinek; also his influence on writers like WG Sebald Josef Winkler and even those working in a similar vein Teju Cole's Open City comes immediately to mind demonstrates how critical his work is to literature being produced today on topics we have only just begun to explore—and luckily topics that are so ineffable and even problematic that one needn't fear a dearth of such works any time in the near future